Subscribe to our Blogs

Entries in commercial (2)

Monday
Sep232013

Benefits of Tree Pruning

Redspire Pear trees before: Encroaching on building, shading planting Redspire Pear trees after: Light and air reach the understory planting

Fall is here! Fall is full of fun festivals and corn mazes but don't let those distract you from thinking ahead in regards to your trees. We're at the tail end of hurricane season and at the beginning of harsh weather in the form of heavy snow, ice, and strong winds. Fall is the time for pruning large and ornamental trees.

The benefits of pruning a tree include safety and aesthetics. Heavy snow loads, ice storms and strong winds can cause healthy as well as diseased and dead limbs to break off and drop under the stress. Removing dead wood and lower limbs can prevent debris damage from falling limbs while providing a crisp and clean new look. 

When the limbs are thinned out, it allows for more light and air to pass through and the understory planting will thrive. Ever see a tree sway slightly in the breeze? It might look dangerous, and it can be if the canopy is so thick that the wind moves the tree as one piece but when that wind can pass through as well as around the canopy, that makes a tree stronger. The tree is basically developing "muscles" to help it weather future winds.

Small trees can be pruned more easily than large trees but you will always get better results from a professional. Large trees require the help of climbers, trucks, machinery and arborists with a vast knowledge of tree growth habit. You don't want a novice climbing up 100 feet above the ground level. Experienced arborists, like our own Gary Carbocci of Tree Care Long Island a division of Goldberg and Rodler, can evaluate the trees and surrounding landscape and make recommendations based on years of experience and expert knowledge. Goldberg & Rodler will execute the whole process with professionalism and dedication to bring safety and clarity to your landscape.

See our before and after gallery of the trees we recently pruned in the front of Gurwin Jewish Geriatric in Commack, NY.

Wednesday
Oct032012

Zucker Hillside Hospital: Commercial Landscape Overhaul

Robert Rodler started working at Hillside Hospital before Goldberg & Rodler even existed with J. J. Levison. Levison handed it over to Goldberg & Rodler in the early sixties and we did a ton of work there. Then we did bits and pieces here and there, sprays, tree work, etc. until 2009. The new facilities manager wanted the campus renovated and he contacted us. Maintenance had been getting progressively worse, to the point where the campus was covered in poison ivy, the original design was almost impossible to discern. You can still see the cherry trees, dogwoods and sycamores on the campus that we planted back in the 60's but they were in desperate need of pruning. Limbs wider than a person's leg were dropping dangerously to the ground. The baseball field, apple orchard and formal rose garden had been razed for additional parking as the facility grew. Increased paving was causing massive drainage issues. People would park anywhere they could find a spot, including on the grass, off the road in the woods, there were no curbs or barriers to prevent it. 

BeforeAfterIt was unrecognizable and a perfect example of how maintenance issues can affect more than the landscape. Employees and family member's of patients were extremely unhappy. There was no place to eat or take a break, no place for people to sit, the gazebo was unsafely enclosed by overgrown plants, and one building was hidden behind overgrown yews. 

Gravel for DrainageSandbag DrainageOur first job was the poison ivy removal and pruning and removing hazards in the trees. People had been dumping garbage in the woods so our next task was to clean that up. We redesigned several areas, focusing on the core and most visible parts of the campus first.

 

Gazebo BeforeGazebo AfterWe fixed the drainage issues so they no longer had to pile sandbags in front of the doors (it isn't recommended by health professionals to block hospital doors, in case of emergencies) or deal with a mosquito farm in a swampy lawn area. Many overgrown plantings needed pruning for security reasons, who wants to eat lunch completely enclosed on all sides so you can't see who is approaching? We added curbs and boulders to the areas people were driving and parking in that were unpaved. We made elegant gravel shapes and used water tolerant plantings in areas where runoff collected. 

We sited a lot of trees as part of the Million Trees Project in NYC's boroughs. We redesigned outdoor recreation areas for the patients. We transplanted and relocated plants for the construction happening on the campus. We even installed fountains in the lobby with interior plants. Right now we're working on designs for patients' roof gardens and a parking lot to add more parking. It's in Queens, there's never any parking!