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Entries in fall (13)

Thursday
Oct042012

Bulbs, Bulbs, Bulbs!

I got a great question today about bulbs: "What is a bulb's life span? How many years before I have to replant?"

Red Tulips & Mixed DaffodilsIt depends on the type of bulb. Daffodils should multiply and come back every year, tulips you might get a few years out of but they will never be as nice as the first year. Bulb growers cut the flowers off and ship the bulbs the next year with all that extra energy stored inside. Daffodils are the only critter resistant bulb, so if you have a ton of squirrels or deer, stick with them or plant your tulips under chicken wire so they can't dig them up.

I'm crazy about bulbs, they're one of my favorite plants because I like to make arrangements with them all over my house. I add something to my yard every year! There are so many different varieties out there. Make sure you plant them at the right depth and water thoroughly after. A nice deep fertilization after they're done blooming can help them store up energy for the next season.

Tulips, Pansies, DaffodilsAs far as designs go, I love to mix and match and plant big masses. Use light and dark combinations of tulips to play off each other, such as light and dark pink. Daffodils come in so many colors, sizes and bloom periods now you can have a garden of just daffodils for months! Fragrant daffodils make great cut flowers.

Snowdrops bloom quite possibly when snow is still on the ground. Crocus come up next and let us know spring is here. Hyacinths show up around Easter & Passover. After that comes the riot of color from daffodils and tulips, then alliums to usher in the summer. The giant globe shape of some of the alliums make a statement in a bed of liriope or other groundcover. They also make for great cut flowers and you can let them dry out and have an arrangement all year.

Hyacinth & Early, Mini Daffodils (Tete a Tete)

Bulbs don't need to be divided like perennials do for rejuvenation, but some bulbs will dig themselves deeper or into an awkward position which can inhibit growth and/or blooming. I turned over a bed of wood scilla (by happy accident when I was putting in new perennials and shrubs) that had been planted at least 15 years ago and it revived them and they're blooming great now.

The key to a show stopping bulb display is massing. If there weren't enough one year, add more for the next season. You can never have too many bulbs! They are probably the most cost efficient plant you can put in your garden, especially if you get a naturalizing variety which will multiply and bloom for many years.

Feel free to ask me any questions and get those bulbs in before the ground freezes! 


Friday
Sep282012

Fall & Winter Services

Sign up now for our Fall/Winter Services. If you haven't given a thought to protecting your broadleaf evergreens yet, it isn't too late! An anti-desiccant spray can reduce water loss through the leaves during a time when your plants can’t take in water from the frozen ground. Reapply in mid-winter.

Make sure your gutters are clear. During a heavy snowfall, ice dams can form and water may back up under the flashing behind the gutters. This can cause leaks and if not treated, mold growth.

Road salt can damage your plants. You won’t see the damage until Spring when it is too late. Make sure to pile contaminated snow away from your plants. Try calcium chloride; a less harmful chemical to melt the ice. Calcium is a nutrient plants can tolerate but still minimize the amount you put down.

2-3” of shredded bark or compost at the bases of trees and shrubs can insulate shallow roots and conserve moisture before the soil freezes.

Make sure the flue is clear in your chimney so you can snuggle by the fire all winter.

Did you wrap up or store your furniture? We offer shrink wrapping for outdoor furniture, barbecues, pots and even boats.

Who's doing your holiday decorations and/or lighting? Sick of getting up on that ladder every year? Let us do it for you while you stay inside with a cup of hot cocoa.

 

Monday
Sep242012

The Time Is Now

We're already thinking about Memorial Day at Goldberg & Rodler. It's a common deadline for landscape construction. People want to have parties, family gatherings, use their outdoor spaces to the fullest when the sun is shining. Our office gets flooded with calls when spring rolls around, usually when the crocus and daffodil pop up. Nobody thinks about summer flowers and sitting out on their decks and patios or going swimming when there's snow on the ground. Get a head start with a landscape design in the fall or winter and you can break ground in the spring. Get a head start on construction and you can be having fun in the spring!

If you're building a new home or an addition, think about installing screen planting now. As long as the trees and/or shrubs aren't in the way of the contractors the plants will have a whole season's head start on growing. When your construction is complete the screen planting will be there to provide privacy to enjoy your new space.

If you already have a plan and the ground hasn't frozen yet, get a head start on the construction. If you have concrete work in your plans, start pouring before the winter sets in. Concrete takes a long time to cure and getting a jump on it helps when spring comes and you're ready to set the pavers or mortar a veneer. It also allows time for the sub-grade and/or backfill to settle.

Fall is the time to start planning, planting and building. It gives you ample time to get necessary permits approved. If a permit is denied to either need to revise and resubmit or apply for a variance. Either way it is a long process. It never hurts to plan ahead! Once the weather warms up, you want to be out there enjoying your property, not watching from inside while it get's ripped up and put back together.

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