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Entries in garden (21)

Monday
Apr242017

Introducing: Chris Tanner

Chris Tanner: Property Management Specialist

We'd like to welcome a new member to the Goldberg & Rodler family. Chris Tanner has become part of our landscape car team in the role of Property Management Specialist. The success of your garden depends heavily on the knowledge and expertise of the people managing it. We are very pleased to announce that Chris Tanner has joined us in that role. Chris is an experienced foreman and for 30 plus years has installed many award-winning landscapes. For the past several years, he has concentrated his talents in the Garden Care area. He has a creative and artistic eye for details and he and his crew are dedicated to making sure your landscape will always look its best. To contact Chris, email him at chris@goldbergandrodler.net.Chris makes sure all landscapes in Goldberg & Rodler's Garden Care program receive proper horticultural care and consideration. 

Wednesday
Apr192017

A Contemplative Garden

Healing Gardens were first recognized in medieval Cloister Gardens where the monks grew herbs known for their medicinal and healing qualities.  The Cloisters at Fort Tryon Park in Northern Manhattan is a picture-perfect example of a contemplative garden.  As they say, what is old is new again and for the past decade or so, we have come to realize the benefits of self-healing. 

Hume Japanese Stroll Garden in Locust Valley

Whether to engage in yoga, physical exercise, growing our own vegetable and herbs, converting to vegetarianism, holistic medicine or investing in organic foods, we are all searching for a natural way to avoid illness, cure chronic disease and quiet everyday stresses. The simple act of gardening is known to be therapeutic, both emotionally and physically and subliminally establishes a link to the earth and our ancient ancestors. 

Who doesn’t find respite indulging in a cup of coffee on the porch or patio on a beautiful spring morning!  Wouldn’t it be nice to have your own private space to escape from the frenetic world to find solace, or meditate surrounded by the peace and tranquility of nature?   It is here where we can bring the fragrance of grandma’s lilacs from our childhood memories or the hummingbirds that captivated us on a vacation long ago. 

Hume Japanese Stroll Garden in Locust Valley

Whatever it is that appeals to our most inner self should be given due consideration when designing our personal sanctuary.  Find a quiet place on your property or, if one does not exist, create one.  This garden space should be enclosed whether by attractive fence panels, trees, or shrubs separating one’s self from any intrusive sounds or views. A comfortable bench, maybe stone or teak, may lure you in and provide a place to rest and reflect.   A simple water feature with a bubbler or water fall can be incorporated into the plan helping to quiet the mind and mask unwanted sounds, or a small pond to cool off on a hot summer’s day.   A single sculpture that is meaningful to you might be the focal point.  Perhaps, the focus can be a bird house or feeder, complemented with shrubs that attract birds. The planting should represent nature and be soothing with subtle shades of green, interesting foliage and textures.  Flowering trees and shrubs can provide color, but avoid strong colors that may jar your senses rather than calm the mind.  The garden should provide an environment for quiet introspection.

Hume Japanese Stroll Garden in Locust Valley

Many Asian gardens are designed for the purpose of contemplation and reflection.  They typically include a grouping of 3 rocks carefully positioned to represent heaven, mankind and earth, a stone lantern, and a pond representing paradise.   The John P. Humes Japanese Stroll Garden in Locust Valley is a fascinating study of the Japanese garden and should be visited several times to fully understand the meditative and healing qualities, as well as the symbolism that such a garden represents.  

A visit to either The Cloisters or John P. Humes Japanese Stroll Garden will surely entice you to identify the elements you need to provide the perfect setting for your Contemplative Garden.

In today's busy world, we could all use our own personal space where we could go to getway from it all.  Let us help you create your own contemplative garden.  Call us at 631-271-6460 or visit our website www.goldbergandrodler.com.

Photos by: Maria Ferrero

Written by: Maria Ferrero

Friday
May062016

An Award Winning, Peaceful, Passive Garden

The soothing sound of water trickling over the rocks creates a calming backdropIntroducing our 2016 NALP Grand Award Winner, 2015 LINLA Gold Award Winner for Passive Use and 2016 NYSNLA Environmental Beautification Award Winner. We designed a soothing space in East Northport with a waterfall and pond to create a relaxing environment with a harmonic balance using natural rock formations and the sound of flowing water. The interplay of light and shadow add to the relaxing garden scene. Plant textures and vibrant color surround the irregular bluestone seating area.

A cast iron urn elevates colorful annuals plantings in the landscape, offering a unique focal pointThe homeowners are very adamant about their privacy and don’t want to see any visual signs of neighbors while they are in the backyard. The new border planting throughout the site was woven into existing vegetation. Large hemlocks surrounding the property are routinely treated for woolly adelgid and were pruned to allow for light and air to reach the understory. Our client did not want a typical row of screen planting, so our solution was to utilize a woodland aesthetic with thick, layered planting and a charismatic border.

Carefully crafted views through the landscape highlight different focal points at every turnThe homeowners love to entertain and have large parties for up to 100 people, making a large lawn area a necessity. Our clients also adore their children. They have had dedicated annual planting themes based on their kid’s favorite colors, showcased at their graduation parties. Each year, a new annual theme is designed for the site. The homeowners are very involved with their landscape and annual color displays for spring, summer and fall. They are consistently involved with providing inspiration and suggestions for planting. We have added large cast iron urns and cast stone planters that provide an elevated explosion of color throughout the landscape and have increased the impact of the changing seasons.

This multi seasonal display is enjoyed by both friends and family throughout the year and is a tranquil getaway from the bustling commotion of day to day life.

Tuesday
Dec152015

Tom Rodler - LINLA 51st Man of the Year Award

LINLA is Proud to Announce the Man of Year…Mr Tom Rodler.
Click on photo to learn more.
Each year, since 1965, the Long Island Nursery and Landscape Association, LINLA, gathers to celebrate the accomplishments of its fellow industry leaders. For many years, LINLA has had the pleasure to distinguish individuals for their notable contributions to our industry, highlight their hard work, and recognize their dedication. For the 51st Annual Man of the Year, Tom Rodler was awarded this honor.

As President of the award winning landscape and design firm of Goldberg and Rodler, he has followed in the footsteps of his father, Robert Rodler, by overseeing each and every aspect of the business. Tom has been a staunch supporter and believer in educating both consumers and members of the industry. Tom has taught classes in landscape design, drafting, and landscape construction at the State University of New York at Farmingdale for the past seventeen years. All of his classes were very hands on and student centered. He has also been a guest professor at SUNY Cobleskill and The State University of Morrisville. Tom has been a valued instructor for the review programs of the New York State Nursery Landscape Association Certified Nursery and Landscape Professional exam. Tom lectures at various garden clubs and school educational programs to help promote the landscape industry to the public here on Long Island. He has also been involved with career day at different high schools throughout Long Island and taught various educational programs to students to stimulateThe National Association of Landscape Professionals Grand Award
Goldberg & Rodler's Seaside Sustainability Project.
Click on photo to learn more.
 interest in the industry.

Early in his career, Tom starred in an extra help landscape education program on cable television. The show involved interviewing guests, making interactive presentations relating to different subjects, and answering live calls and questions on the air. Ask him to tell you some stories about this experience!

President Tom Rodler plants a new tree, with the help of Cohen Children's Medical Center patients.
Click on photo to learn more.
Tom has also volunteered much of his free time to supporting the industry. He has served as Past President of both the Long Island Nursery Landscape Association and the New York State Nursery Landscape Association. He is responsible for the design and development of the Garden of Awareness at SUNY Farmingdale and the Garden of Hope at Eisenhower Park for the Long Island Chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, the Harry Chapin Butterfly Garden in Huntington's Heckscher Park, and contributing to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Park in Farmingville.

In his personal life, Tom enjoys spending time with his family and friends. He is an avid outdoorsman who enjoys fishing, walks in the woods, and time at the beach.

Thursday
Jul302015

Adapting the English Cottage Garden 

The English Cottage Garden has become one of the most beloved garden styles, provoking images and visualizations of the idyllic garden.  The mystique and romance of the English Cottage Garden captivates every gardener’s imagination.  Interestingly, the earliest history of cottage gardens teach us that they were for the most part, strictly utilitarian, planted mostly with fruit trees, vegetables and herbs with a pen for chickens.  It wasn’t until the 18th century, when beautiful cottages were built for the ‘well to do,’ that the small working gardens developed into the beautiful flower gardens we admire today. This well placed bird house adds charm to an otherwise simple flower border.

It is a quandary, how we can love and want our gardens to emulate the cottage garden, but we abhor the idea of informal, messy looking flower beds, the very essence of the cottage garden.  Having had the pleasure of visiting Sissinghurst Castle in England, one of the great examples of romantic gardens, and Monet’s garden in Giverny, France,  I remember thinking that I would be tarred and feathered by my clients had I designed these gardens.  However, the overall effect was complete and total awe.  They have a wonderful random and haphazard quality about them that appeals to today’s most avid gardener. 

So how do we meld the nostalgia of the English garden with our busy lifestyles and need for minimal maintenance?   Let us begin with garden accessories. Maybe we can add a comfortable, well-placed bench where one can relax and enjoy the peace and tranquility of the garden, or an arbor covered with roses or clematis inviting one to enter.  A picket or antique wrought iron gate at the end of the front walk, or groupings of terra cotta pots filled with a riot of colorful annuals and situated in sunny spaces around the yard can mirror the charm of the English Cottage Garden. Jasmine, gardenias, rosemary, and other fragrant annuals or culinary herbs assimilated into the pots offer the visitor the lingering fragrance so important if one wants to achieve the true essence of the cottage garden. 

Meandering moss, stepping stone or gravel paths, cottage style bird accessories such as feeders, baths and houses are details that can also add charm to the cottage garden.   Raised beds planted with vegetables and herbs, a berry patch, dwarf fruit trees or a few pots of tomatoes are details so characteristic of these garden spaces that at least one should be included. A perennial border at Sissinghurst Castle in England.

To emulate the flower gardens of England, consider inter-planting your existing perennial gardens or annual borders with taller perennials and annuals.   Cleome, although it can’t possibly replace the allure of hollyhocks, is a great old fashioned annual that can represent the charm and informality of the cottage garden.  Other favorites include Salvia ‘Black and Blue,’ Salvia ‘Indigo Spires’ and Nicotiana.  Although perennials such as Filipendula ‘Venusta’ and Campanula persicifolia would certainly be more appropriate to the character of the garden, they cannot compete with the long blooming season annuals offer. Although located in Giverny, for me this bench in Monet's garden is a classic representation of English Cottage charm.

Whether you add a bench or plant the terra cotta pots you have hidden in the garage with a potpourri of color, or you add all of the above, you will be lured into the charm and nostalgia of yesteryear and simpler times.

If you would like advice or guidance creating your cottage garden, please call or e mail me to schedule a consultation.

Written by Maria Morrison – Ferrero

Photos by Maria Morrison – Ferrero