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Entries in green (3)

Thursday
Sep252014

Aerate and Overseed for a Pristine Lawn Renovation

Core aeration follows right behind fertilization

The grass is always greener on the other side.  Well that doesn’t have to be so true anymore.  Now is a great time to start a lawn renovation and have the best looking lawn on your block.  Fall is the best season to implement a lawn renovation and will result in lush, healthy, green grass for years to come.    Over time lawns can use up their stored nutrients and lose their rigorous growing habit.  That is why it is important to resupply your lawn with fertilizer, aerate and overseed every other year or as your lawn needs it. 

A slit seeder makes grooves in the grass and controls seed drop ratioThe process begins with fertilization, and should be done at least once a year.  Immediately after, core aeration is necessary to divide and split the existing lawn root structure.   Core aeration removes plugs of dirt from clay soils, leaving a hole to be filled with seed, water and air. This void is necessary for air and water to percolate the dense soil.   A pocket of nutrients is created for the lawn to revive its root structure because there is more space to form new root growth.  When the plugs are pulled out of the ground, it decreases compaction in the lawn, especially in areas with clay based soils. 

Once aerated, the next step is to seed your lawn.  Overseeding can rejuvenate dying lawns, and invigorate new lawns.   Look for areas in the lawn that are thinner, and browning, and focus on these spots to apply new grass seed.  If your lawn is still fairly new, overseeding can be useful to create a consistent new layer of grass, giving it the boost it needs for spring.  Overseeding, when paired with core aeration is the best way to get a greener and healthier lawn because the grass seed gets into the pockets and holds moisture throughout the winter. 

Some essential things to remember when doing core aeration and slit seeding are:

  • Mark out all sprinkler heads and invisible dog fences, they could be damaged by aeration machinery
  • Do not mow newly seeded areas until it has grown to 2- 2½ inches tall
  • Avoid all foot traffic, and keep pets off of germinating areas
  • Consistently water seeded lawn everyday for at least 2 weeks; seed that dries out will not germinate. 
  • Fall is the best time to aerate and seed.

If you are not a DIY person, don’t hesitate to contact Goldberg and Rodler today.  We have developed a team of professionals to help with your lawn management and renovation.  Goldberg and Rodler can renovate and install lawns on residential and commercial properties.  We are happy to help you achieve your dream lawn today.

Written by Nick Onesto

The final result is a thriving and lush lawn

Tuesday
Aug142012

Green Roof = Sustainable Design

A green roof is just one of many steps toward more sustainable and environmentally friendly landscapes. We installed a green roof in Eaton’s Neck using the LiveRoof System. The residence is designed specifically for several green roofs; not just for aesthetic value but environmental as well.
  
Advantages:
- Soil and plant matter provides insulation for temperature & sound
- Reduces stormwater runoff by absorbing water 
- Reduces air pollution & lowers the heat island effect with sedums that evapotranspirate at night
 
Pre-grown modular system:
- Minimal irrigation needs, especially once it is established
- Uses fire resistant succulent planting; plants retain moisture and are fit for arid conditions
- 25-50% energy savings 
- Lightweight modules decrease load on roof
- Repair requires minimal disruption of system; trays can removed and replaced individually
- Plant choices offer visual interest all year round
Thursday
Jul122012

Rain Gardens & Rain Barrels

We all learned about the water cycle in elementary school. It rains, plants and soil soak up water, plants evapotranspirate moisture back into the atmosphere and standing water evaporates, it rains. That's the simplified version. In reality, in our developed world, it takes a lot more steps for the water to go from the clouds to the ground again. Sewers, drains, and drywells capture runoff from impervious surfaces like asphalt, concrete and roofs and this water is either contained until it can slowly migrate back into the soil through the perforated wall of a concrete drywell, or it is sent to a sewage treatment plant to be treated with chemicals and reintroduced into our water cycle. The more impervious surfaces that cover our earth, the more water that is treated and wasted.
 
How can we lessen the impact on our drainage systems? Rain gardens. Let the soil and plants naturally filter out impurities and toxins from the runoff, as in other unpaved areas, and have a beautiful, diverse garden to enjoy. Sure, you can get a backhoe and even a crane to come in and dig down until you hit drainable material, then install drywells, and surface drains, but that is expensive. While it is currently the accepted way to deal with storm water runoff, it adds yet another step to a natural process that worked fine before human intervention.
 
You can also try a rain barrel. Hook one up to your downspout and use it for irrigation. Why pay the water company for treated water when you can collect it unpolluted for free? Some water tolerant (aka "likes wet feet") plants for these areas would be acorus, clethra, iris, daylily, bog rosemary, hypericum, and willow among others.