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Entries in landscape (11)

Thursday
Jan262017

Goldberg & Rodler Earns Top Landscape Award on Long Island

Back in October 2014 this property was featured in our Project of the Month blog and is now aptly named The Manor on the Hill.  The design for this Port Washington property began in summer 2013.  The Goldberg & Rodler design team earned the Judges Award, the top honor in the Long Island Nursery and Landscape (LINLA) awards program, and also won the Gold Award in the Single Family Residence category.

UPDATE 06/22/17: We were just honored with the New York State Nursery & Landscape Associtaion (NYSNLA) 2017 Environmental Beautification Award: Residential Over $100,000 for this project!

The front yard is now a cobblestone and asphalt parking court comprised of tiered retaining walls and increases the usefulness of the space. Planting helps soften the boldness of the brick manor and the large natural boulder is showcased.This traditional style brick home is the definition of a diamond in the rough.  The house sits atop a hill, oriented on an angle, and was found with a landscape in utter disrepair.  Our clients had a vision for their home to reclaim its historic integrity while providing the comforts of a modern lifestyle.

BEFORE: The original driveway was a dark and desolate ........AFTER:The entry is now transformed to an inviting and open experience.

The first obstacle was grading the site, which was a massive undertaking.  Since the lot was so small, staging equipment and materials was a constant struggle.  Tight scheduling and diligent project management were essential components for conducting this project smoothly.

BEFORE: A nine foot wide spread footing is making its debut......AFTER:Brick and bluestone walls are paired with Long Island boulders.

The existing bluestone patio in the rear yard was recycled into a new form that included an aged brick edge.  The patio was then extended to accommodate a brick and bluestone fire pit.  A u-shaped outdoor kitchen was an essential part of this reimagined landscape.

The backyard is now a series of entertaining spaces enlivened by a full outdoor kitchen, gas fire pit, and seating/dining areas.The outdoor kitchen has a chunky bluestone veneer and provides a textured aesthetic with a smooth bluestone counter.

An incredible amount of coordination was required to carve this diamond out of the rough.  The process was grueling and taxing on all parties involved and the result speaks volumes about the power of teamwork.  The amount of construction required for this project would make most people shudder or retreat.  With determination and due diligence Goldberg and Rodler transformed this landscape into a unique lifestyle experience.

The Manor on the Hill is composed of a dynamic arrangement of entertaining and advantageous spaces. The new design succeeds in creating a private getaway from the hustle and bustle of everyday life.We can tailor a landscape design to fit your lifestyle as well.  All projects large and small are treated with the same level of award winning detail.  We can do this for you.  Call Goldberg & Rodler at (631) 271-6460 and we will mobilize our design team to help enhance your lifestyle.  Now is the time for planning this year's garden, so call today!

Written by: Nick Onesto

Friday
Oct162015

Landscape Design Principles and Elements of Composition: 50 Shades of Landscape

This is the third in a series of articles on Landscape Design Principles and Elements of Composition (click here for the first entry on Color and here for the second entry on Texture). Today we want to talk about light and shadow in the landscape. Light and shadow could be simplified into sun and shade but light and shadow are about so much more than that. Light and shadow are about depth and dimension.

Dappled shade on Irregular Bluestone patio surrounded by a vibrant perennial border.There are different types of shade. When talking about plants in particular, there is light, partial, full and deep shade. There can be a total blocking of light, like from a solid roof or dense shade tree, or dappled or intermittent shade, like from a lace canopied shade tree or pergola. Shade is great for sitting and dining areas where you’d like prolonged shade and cooler temperatures. Mature shade trees are worth their weight in gold. Think twice when locating a new pool. You can easily cut down a tree, but it can take decades for a newly planted tree to offer enough shade for a large area.  Most people want their pool and pool patio to be in a sunny area. The sun offers natural warming of the water, but even with warm water, swimming in the shade can be chilly. A pool patio with some umbrellas for sun protection is perfect for keeping the area nice and warm while cooling off in the pool.

There are different types of plants for sun or shade and they run the gamut from full sun all day long to full shade and anywhere in between. Pay attention to flower colors for different lighting scenarios. In deep shade, white, apricot, pale yellow, pastels of pink and lavender, and other light colors really pop and brighten up a shadowy area. In bright sun, vibrant and saturated colors stand out more than their paler counterparts. Deep reds, corals, purples, yellows, oranges and blues stand up to the sun’s dramatic rays.

Pergola casting striped shade over a sophisticated seating area, emphasizing the architectural detail of the overhead structure.Outdoor lighting not only extends the use of a space from day to night, it can be used to highlight architectural features such as this Westchester granite fireplace.Just as shadows can be functional in the day, they are also useful at night. Use shadows for dramatic effect when it is dark out. Pergolas that cast filtered shade during the day can also act as a dramatic filter for light at night. Lighting angled up or down through a pergola sets the scene for an intimate gathering. Using lights in the garden can highlight more than the architectural elements like pergolas and stone walls. Utilize spotlights to display specimen trees. Moonlighting in a mature shade tree is more than functional; it creates a fun nighttime atmosphere. Moonlighting involves placing downward facing light fixtures 30 feet up inside of a tree’s canopy. With the right lighting scheme, not only can a property be used day or night, it can also enhance the beauty of both man and Mother Nature’s architecture.

Aesthetically, light and shadow play a huge part in the drama of our gardens. Functionally, you need a varying palette of height, spread and depth from your plantings to create a harmonized space. Hierarchy is king in our next piece on scale in the garden!

 

Written by Ashley Palko Haugsjaa

Wednesday
Sep232015

Farewell to Summer, Autumn is Here

Records indicate that this summer and, in fact, this year is looking to be the hottest on record.  This extreme heat coupled with very little rainfall has placed our trees, shrubs and lawns, under considerable stress. Irrigation systems, which we tend to over rely on, are not designed to replace Mother Nature, but to supplement her.  Have you ever noticed how much greener and lusher the garden appears after a rainfall?A lush expanse of lawn thrives after recent renovations and some TLC.

 To help counter this stressful condition and give our lawn and gardens a helping hand, Goldberg and Rodler has several ala carte services to offer you. These methods have been proven to be very effective in improving the health and beauty of your landscape. The cooler temperature of fall and our special services are a perfect combination.

 Right now your lawn will benefit from core aeration and over-seeding. Core aeration is the systematic removal of small plugs of lawn, including thatch and some soil, which are tossed out of the ground by a machine called a core aerator. The small plugs sit on the top of the lawn, distributing the soil and other elements to help promote the growth of the new seedlings which are then over seeded onto the lawn. The cores also bring valuable air circulation to the lawn’s root system.Core aeration follows behind fertilization to reinvigorate existing lawn

 You have now relieved the soil of harmful compaction and made an excellent medium for your new grass seeds. The grass seed will be evenly spread over the entire lawn area to make an even, new addition of young, healthy grass.  You have now helped the lawn become healthy, more resistant to drought and also better protected from insects, pests and diseases.

 Another option to strengthen your living landscape investment and irreplaceable specimen shade trees are precise soil injections of the proper nutrients delivered by deep root injection and soil drenching.

 Providing the proper nutrients into soil is our specialty. We do this when the weather is cooling down in the fall. These treatments will also provide the proper nutrients where they are needed most at the root system and reduce the stress that this past summer has caused.

 G&R certified professionals spray anti-desiccant to protect Hollies, Rhododendron and LaurelsLast of all, adding winter protection with an application of Vapor Guard, an anti-dessicant,  on your broadleaf evergreens will help protect your rhododendron, azalea, hollies and laurels by coating the leaves with a beneficial clear wax like substance. This slows down transpiration and therefore helps the plant retain moisture through the drying winds of the winter months.

 After a hot, dry season like this one, now is the time to protect, preserve and invest in the future health of your landscape. Call today to arrange a complimentary consultation and reserve a spot for these services in our upcoming calendar.

 

Written by Gary S. Carbocci

Friday
Apr172015

Landscape Design Principles and Elements of Composition: Texture

Feathery plumes of Dwarf Fountain Grass alongside Bluestone Stepping Stones and crushed Long Island gravel.This is the second in a series of articles on Landscape Design Principles and Elements of Composition (click here for the first entry on Color). Today we want to talk about texture in the landscape. There are many ways to achieve different textures with plants, but utilizing natural materials in a garden such as bark and foliage can work well in combination with other elements like gravel, stone, and wood that contribute to a garden’s sensory experience.

Groundcovers, especially between stepping stones, can lend to a variety of ground plane textures. Imagine the feel of soft, cool grass or gatherings of moss under bare feet on a spring morning. Soft, fuzzy perennial Lamb’s Ear in the garden is wonderful to rub between your fingers, as are the leaves of a sage plant. Showy grasses like Hakonechloa or Dwarf Fountain Grass blades are anything but sharp. Get up close and touch the ethereally light, delicate plumes on an ornamental grass when it flowers in the late summer. A mass in the distance is a beautiful visual but there’s nothing like sitting amongst them. Enjoy the grasses from the weathered wood of a favorite garden bench, or planted with a piece of bleached driftwood as a sculptural element to contrast the wispy blades.

Textural contrast of ferns and a Weeping White Pine.We can’t talk about foliage textures without mentioning ferns. There are so many varieties hardy in our area, all of them a textural delight to use in the garden. The fronds of a fern are what we notice first, but get up close and see the curled up fiddleheads (before the frond opens). Even the underside of the fern has something to offer with the clusters of sporangia, usually a contrasting red or brown, especially showy on the evergreen Christmas Fern.

Spiky variegated Agave nestled softly among Scaevola, Lantana and Alyssum.On the opposite side of soft vegetation are the bristly, sharp plants like Agave and Prickly Pear Cactus. Agave is mainly used as an annual or indoor plant here but Yucca is another spiky plant that you can use in the garden and there are many varieties hardy to Long Island.  Prickly Pear Cactus is considered hardy but may take a hit in harsh winters. It is best to plant them in a protected, well-drained area if you want them outside. The needles of many conifers also fall into the sharp category such as Blue Spruce. Not only is the color striking but the coarse surface makes these evergreens stand out from softer White Pine and the many textures of arborvitae.

The coppery, exfoliating trunk of a Paperbark Maple at Planting Fields Arboretum.Exfoliating bark on a Crape Myrtle, Paperbark Maple or River Birch adds almost an architectural texture during all seasons. Though they may look very rough to some, they can all seem quite wispy at times. A Japanese Dogwood, Hinoki Cypress or Alaskan Cedar on the other hand, offers a very firm exfoliating bark - not ones you’d want to touch. They are definitely a stronger visual presence in the garden. Then you have the smooth gray bark of a stately Beech tree that resembles a column holding up a canopy.

A garden needs rough and rigid objects to balance the smooth and soft offerings. The obvious rigidity in a landscape is the paved surfaces, but we will go beyond that. Stone walls are classic in a garden as are brick and stone paving. These materials also last a long time in the garden, weathering over the years. Weathering can add to the character of the stone and brick and lend a softer feeling to the aged hardscape. Cast stone and terra cotta planters are another way to bring solid forms into the landscape. Whether a rounded shape or squared off trough, planters provide a solid visual anchor for specialty plantings like summer annuals or winter displays.

Visually and physically speaking, textures in the garden are one of the greatest ways we experience outdoor space. Another major influence is lighting and its counterpart shadows. With the right lighting scheme, not only can a property be used day or night, it can also enhance the beauty of both man and Mother Nature’s architecture. Stay tuned for our next piece on light and shadow in the garden!

 

Written by Ashley Palko Haugsjaa

Wednesday
Mar042015

Introducing: Mary Catherine Schaefer Gutmann

Mary Catherine Schaefer GutmannGoldberg and Rodler is thrilled to announce a new addition to our staff of horticultural experts. Mary Catherine Gutmann has joined Goldberg & Rodler, Inc. and brought her significant horticultural knowledge and experience to serve our clients. Mary Catherine has over 25 years of plant diagnostic and garden care skills, most recently with Ireland Gannon Associates and Martin Viette Nursery.

What does that mean for you, our valued client? In her new role as After Care Manager for Goldberg & Rodler, Inc., she will be inspecting, reviewing and providing specific horticultural advice for all of our landscape projects, new and old. For our maintenance clients, Mary Catherine will manage a schedule of regular visits to look after all the fine gardening details for our clients' lawns and gardens. If your landscape project needs any type of service or replacements plants, Mary Catherine will be involved with that as well.

We've added another important professional to our team in an effort to be more efficient and, most importantly, better serve our clients.

So when your hear that Mary Catherine is going to visit your garden, or if you see her out there performing an inspection, go out there and say hello. She will happily answer your questions so fire away and be prepared to raise your horticultural IQ.

You can reach Mary Catherine several different ways:

Email: marycatherine@goldbergandrodler.net
Office: (631) 271-6460 x26
Cell: (631) 258-4004