Subscribe to our Blogs

Entries in lawn (8)

Thursday
Feb022017

Healthy Landscapes Are the Root of Happiness

A great article from our friends at NALP, National Association of Landscape Professionals. Love your landscape! Want to protect your family from ticks, fleas, mosquitoes, and more? Contact us today to protect your property! We have a range of sprays including organic options to protect you and your family. Our newest team member, Chris Tanner, is an expert on caring for your plants. He will make sure everything is pruned properly and at the appropriate time. Concerned about oak wilt? Speak to our arborists about your trees.

Wednesday
Mar042015

Introducing: Mary Catherine Schaefer Gutmann

Mary Catherine Schaefer GutmannGoldberg and Rodler is thrilled to announce a new addition to our staff of horticultural experts. Mary Catherine Gutmann has joined Goldberg & Rodler, Inc. and brought her significant horticultural knowledge and experience to serve our clients. Mary Catherine has over 25 years of plant diagnostic and garden care skills, most recently with Ireland Gannon Associates and Martin Viette Nursery.

What does that mean for you, our valued client? In her new role as After Care Manager for Goldberg & Rodler, Inc., she will be inspecting, reviewing and providing specific horticultural advice for all of our landscape projects, new and old. For our maintenance clients, Mary Catherine will manage a schedule of regular visits to look after all the fine gardening details for our clients' lawns and gardens. If your landscape project needs any type of service or replacements plants, Mary Catherine will be involved with that as well.

We've added another important professional to our team in an effort to be more efficient and, most importantly, better serve our clients.

So when your hear that Mary Catherine is going to visit your garden, or if you see her out there performing an inspection, go out there and say hello. She will happily answer your questions so fire away and be prepared to raise your horticultural IQ.

You can reach Mary Catherine several different ways:

Email: marycatherine@goldbergandrodler.net
Office: (631) 271-6460 x26
Cell: (631) 258-4004

Thursday
Sep252014

Aerate and Overseed for a Pristine Lawn Renovation

Core aeration follows right behind fertilization

The grass is always greener on the other side.  Well that doesn’t have to be so true anymore.  Now is a great time to start a lawn renovation and have the best looking lawn on your block.  Fall is the best season to implement a lawn renovation and will result in lush, healthy, green grass for years to come.    Over time lawns can use up their stored nutrients and lose their rigorous growing habit.  That is why it is important to resupply your lawn with fertilizer, aerate and overseed every other year or as your lawn needs it. 

A slit seeder makes grooves in the grass and controls seed drop ratioThe process begins with fertilization, and should be done at least once a year.  Immediately after, core aeration is necessary to divide and split the existing lawn root structure.   Core aeration removes plugs of dirt from clay soils, leaving a hole to be filled with seed, water and air. This void is necessary for air and water to percolate the dense soil.   A pocket of nutrients is created for the lawn to revive its root structure because there is more space to form new root growth.  When the plugs are pulled out of the ground, it decreases compaction in the lawn, especially in areas with clay based soils. 

Once aerated, the next step is to seed your lawn.  Overseeding can rejuvenate dying lawns, and invigorate new lawns.   Look for areas in the lawn that are thinner, and browning, and focus on these spots to apply new grass seed.  If your lawn is still fairly new, overseeding can be useful to create a consistent new layer of grass, giving it the boost it needs for spring.  Overseeding, when paired with core aeration is the best way to get a greener and healthier lawn because the grass seed gets into the pockets and holds moisture throughout the winter. 

Some essential things to remember when doing core aeration and slit seeding are:

  • Mark out all sprinkler heads and invisible dog fences, they could be damaged by aeration machinery
  • Do not mow newly seeded areas until it has grown to 2- 2½ inches tall
  • Avoid all foot traffic, and keep pets off of germinating areas
  • Consistently water seeded lawn everyday for at least 2 weeks; seed that dries out will not germinate. 
  • Fall is the best time to aerate and seed.

If you are not a DIY person, don’t hesitate to contact Goldberg and Rodler today.  We have developed a team of professionals to help with your lawn management and renovation.  Goldberg and Rodler can renovate and install lawns on residential and commercial properties.  We are happy to help you achieve your dream lawn today.

Written by Nick Onesto

The final result is a thriving and lush lawn

Tuesday
Aug192014

AUGUST'S PROJECT OF THE MONTH

Site conditions prior to construction at
Zucker Hillside Hospital Park

Our current project of the month is a work in progress at the North Shore Zucker Hillside Hospital Park project. As a work in progress, this open space was the original location for cottages used by staff and patient's of the hospital.  With the removal of the cottages in recent years because of safety issues, the area became a non functional space with no purpose until now. The buildings were removed and the area became an undefined space with people just wandering through haphazardly.


When we were asked by the hospital to look at the space, the options for its use started to evolve. We developed the idea of a plaza or hub to connect the activities that occur daily within each building due to the location of the area between several main buildings. 

Lighting and pedestrian elements come together to maximize the use of the space

The Goldberg and Rodler team designed a master plan for the space to include an outdoor dining area, a plaza including a sculpture, walking paths with lighting, sitting areas, refuse disposal, landscape planting and a great lawn which can also accommodate tents and large events.


In the first phase of the project, we installed concrete walking paths providing connections to the surrounding buildings and decorative lighting along these pathways. This gives a sense of security for those walking from building to building while working night hours.


In the upcoming weeks, we will add refuse collectors, benches, picnic tables and a new seeded lawn to finish phase one.


Look for more on this project in the upcoming year…

 

 

 

Written by Rich Lambert

 

Thursday
May082014

Summer Plant Protection

Gazania blooms best in hot, sunny areas. Can't wait for summer to see these beauties!

It's still hard to believe summer is finally here to stay. So after a plant friendly and cool spring it is time to get ready for the hot weather. Our lawns and plants fared well so far and now it is time for all of us, plants and people, to make that seasonal adjustment.

Water is a plant's best friend during the high heat of summer under the blazing hot sun. Right now  your irrigation system should be set on a summer schedule. Maybe it is time to evaluate what type of system you have. Is it as efficient as it could be? In spring you don't need a lot of supplemental irrigation but when the temperatures begin to climb and rain isn't on the horizon, that system will be getting a lot more use. It is better to water less frequently and more deeply than every day for only a few minutes. You want to make sure the water penetrates through the mulch layer and can reach the roots. A drip system lays under the mulch/soil and uses less water than a traditional mist or rotary heads.

Early in the day is the best time to irrigate. If you water in the middle of the day, most of the water will evaporate before it has a chance to penetrate through the soil. If you water late in the day fungus will develop, especially in your lawn. Avoid letting water collect on leaves in the middle of the day; like ants under a magnifying glass, the leaves will fry. Leave your lawn 3-3.5" high in the hottest months. This will help keep the roots cooler by providing some shade. Cutting too short can contribute to browning out. When mowing your lawn, remove no more than 1/3 of the lawn's height at one time. 

Healthy, vibrant lawn. No weeds, well irrigated and maintained.

A few organic choices for the garden that will help your plants thrive include mulch, compost and pruning. Incorporating compost into your soil adds organic matter and will give your plants a boost in nutrients, minimizing the need for synthetic fertilizers. Mulching around your plants keeps the soil cooler in summer and helps with moisture retention. Also, you can mitigate potential damage from poor air circulation or low light penetration with proper pruning.

When it gets hot and humid, there are certain pests and diseases that thrive. Scale, Black Spot, Powdery Mildew and Fungus Gnats are several  to watch out for. Call us if you see small, fuzzy white things that jump on and off of your plants or if you see black spots or a white film on any leaves.  If you see clouds of tiny flying insects, most likely around a wet area, it could be fungus gnats. While they are harmless to humans (they only feed on rotting organic matter) this could indicate you have a standing water issue, which will attract a much worse insect: the mosquito. Our sister company, Tree Care Long Island, has several treatments including horticultural pruning, beneficial insects and liquid and granular applications (including organic options), to treat these issues.

More insects to watch out during the summer include Aphids and Leafhoppers, Grubs, and Spider Mites. Aphids and Leafhoppers can spread scale and powdery mildew between your plants. Grubs eat the roots of your lawn, creating bare patches and holes in your lawn from predators like crows and raccoons digging for dinner. Spider Mites suck the juices out of a plant's leaves and/or needles and cause the plants to defoliate and die.

Is your landscape ready for the heat of summer? If you see any of these conditions, or would like our advice, just contact us and we will be happy to help.

Click here for a Newsletter version of this post.