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Entries in snow (5)

Thursday
Feb062014

Do You Have Cabin Fever?

After a January snowstorm in Centerport. Photo by Nick OnestoIt looks like old man winter still has his grip on Long Island. As I look outside, the ground is still white and it is snowing again with even more snow in the forecast for later this week. It would be nice to get outside and go for a walk without worrying about frostbite or dodging over snow banks to avoid oncoming traffic. Boy, would I like to go somewhere warm and sunny for a week or two.

What can we do to alleviate cabin fever as the winter wanes and the spring approaches? If you can take a few weeks in a warm climate, go ahead. If you can't, here are a few ideas to help deal with the dreary days remaining in winter.

Your indoor plants are living with less light during the winter which translates to needing less fertilizer. How do you know if they need to be fertilized? Well, if they are actively growing or flowering indoors, fertilize them. At least once this winter, give your indoor plants a boost with some fertilizer. Make sure the soil is moist before fertilizing. Water soluble 20-20-20 is good for non-flowering houseplants and 15-30-15 fertilizer is best for flowering plants. If your indoor plants are dormant, suspend fertilizing until the spring.

Housebound weekend days seem to go by more pleasantly when observing nature through a window into your garden. Install a bird feeder outside a window next to a comfy seat and watch the wide variety of birds display their colorful feathers against the gray and white of winter. You can vary the type of seed you provide and thus vary the population of birds that come to visit. Try to keep the squirrels away by placing the feeder away from jumping off points like branches or furniture. The less landing surface the squirrels can find on the feeder will help deter them as well, but a hungry squirrel is a determined squirrel, so there are really no squirrel-proof feeders. Watching the squirrels' antics is sometimes more entertaining than watching the birds eat!

A picture every year to document where your bulbs come up helps to plan for next yearAnother way to banish the winter blues is to look ahead. What would you like to improve outdoors? Planning is an important part in the process of developing a landscape and all of the elements that are integral to a wonderful garden. I like to start with a photo review of last season to assess and evaluate what worked well and what needs improvement. If you don't have photos (think about photo documenting your garden next season), you can mentally walk through your garden in your mind's eye and jot down a few notes. Once the snow melts and the weather warms up a bit, take a walk around your property again. How is the hardscape holding up? Are the trees safe and healthy? What areas of the garden need some help and what areas are doing well? Then develop a strategy for what to improve and how to do it.

Shopping in your own backyard for produce is quick and easyI like to cook, so I always make sure I have enough room for a variety of herbs. What was I missing last year that I want to make sure I have on hand this year? How will I fit in additional plants? Will I have to swap out a variety? How did your vegetable garden do last year? Do you need more light or compost? Maybe you need to have an arborist evaluate your shade trees and selectively prune to boost your vegetable garden's yield. Maybe you don't have an irrigation system, and after the hot, dry summer we had in 2013, you might consider putting in a drip system to make your life easier.

This is where landscape design professionals can be of great value. Planning, creativity and garden development strategy are our expertise. An accomplished and experienced landscape designer can help you remodel portions of your garden, recommend hardscape improvements, help develop new garden areas or prepare plans for a complete renovation if that's the path you're on. Prepare a wish list including your favorite plants, garden themes and lifestyle needs. A landscape plan can be a great way to develop and improve your property with both short and long term goals in mind. Contacting a landscape designer at Goldberg & Rodler in the winter will give you a jump start on spring.

Other ways to beat the winter doldrums include attending garden lectures and workshops or settling in with a good gardening book. Check with your local garden center, library or arboretum to see what activities are on their schedules. If you are looking for a good book focusing on sustainable design and methodology, try "Grow More with Less," by Vincent Simione, the director of Planting Fields Arboretum and Historic State Park in Oyster Bay, Long Island. It is a great guide for a homeowner or professional that can put you on the right track developing your garden in an easy and sustainable way.

So there you have it, a few ideas to distract you from winter until we can get outside again. Good luck, and if you'd like to talk to me about your garden, call me, Sal Masullo, at (631) 271-6460 or email me salm@goldbergandrodler.net, and I would be happy to discuss your landscape with you.

Written by Sal Masullo

Wednesday
Jan222014

Winter Interest in the Garden

Snow topped pine and spruce brings out the blue green color of the needlesWinter gardening in the Northeast can be quite interesting. You might be surprised how enjoyable and beautiful this season can be.

Some highlights during winter include:

EVERGREENS: They stand out this time of year without competition from flowering trees and shrubs. My favorites species are all types of  Holly, Evergreen Magnolia, Cypress and Blue Spruce. Hollies are a deep, shiny green and some have red berries which are great for birds. Variegated English Holly is used as a specimen with the white variegation highlighting any garden space. Interesting structural forms pop when combined with blue-green or yellow foliage on different cultivars of Hinoki Cypress. Anything blue toned like the Colorado or Dwarf Montgomery Spruce is a welcome sight in the winter. I also use cuttings from these for winter decoration in my garden pots and urns or even in a vase indoors. 

Skimmia, bright with red berries in the snow covered landscapeFLOWER COLOR: There are several options for winter blooms. 'Arnold Promise' Witch Hazel blooms mid February with fragrant yellow flowers. Lenten Rose (hellebore) is a perennial that blooms in early March and Snow Drops are bulbs that bloom in late February. Heather is evergreen and can start blooming in November right through to early March. The best thing about these plants is that they bloom anywhere from one to three months and are all deer resistant.

Beautiful closeup of the exfoliating bark on a Paperbark MapleBRANCH COLOR: Try the Red Twig Dogwood, a medium sized deciduous shrub. Their summer appearance is not striking but when is snows the red stems will catch any ones attention. There is also a yellow variety. Important Tip: Prune older brown branches down to the base in the spring to encourage new growth. This new growth will start out a light red and intensify as the season progresses. For the late fall/early winter use deciduous Winterberry. It will give a spectacular show of color with red berries, great for the wildlife. Other plants with attractive berries for the wildlife are Viburnum, Sumac and Bayberry which are all native to our region.

DECORATIVE BARK: Once trees lose their leaves for the winter, their interesting structure and bark is more noticeable. Textures range from the exfoliating bark of River Birch, the cinnamon color and exfoliating bark of Crape Myrtle to the the mottled bark of a mature Sycamore, Dogwood or Stewartia to the smooth, gray bark of a Beech tree. Branching habits are visible on the Contorted Filbert, also known as Harry Lauder's Walking Stick, or the Corkscrew Willow with its curly, twisting branches. These are great to cut and bring indoors for floral arrangements or to use as a support for other indoor plants.

 

The winter can be full of garden delights.

Written by Rick Schneider

Monday
Dec162013

Winter Services: Protection and Prevention

Are you ready to say goodbye to 2013? Is your landscape ready for 2014? While everyone is busy preparing for the holidays, we're preparing for winter and spring. There's still time to protect your plants, clean out your gutters and schedule winter pruning.

Applying anti-desiccant to evergreens.PROTECTION: We're reiterating the important message in our previous article about protecting your plants for the harsh weather we expect during the winter. An anti-desiccant application can reduce water loss through the leaves during a time when your plants can't take in water from the frozen ground. You can reapply mid-winter for additional protection.

Road salt can damage your plants from piled up snow, as well as salt spray from the ocean/sound if you're near the water. Anti-transpirant is one option for reducing the potential for burned foliage. Heavily irrigating the soil in the spring helps wash away the accumulated salt in the soil. Fertilizing with an organic, salt-free fertilizer will promote new leaf growth and proper pruning can ensure the integrity of the plant's structure.

PREVENTION: During a heavy snowfall, if the gutters aren't cleared of snow and debris, ice dams can form on the top above the gutters and water may back up under the flashing behind the gutters. This can cause leaks, and if not treated, mold growth . It is very important to make sure these are clear after a storm if the snow doesn't melt away. Leaves and debris will further aggravate the issue by not allowing proper drainage into the gutters as the snow melts.

WINTER PRUNING: This is better for deciduous shrubs, evergreen hedges and small ornamental trees. The best time for this service is between Thanksgiving and Saint Patrick's Day.

Using a bucket to get up into the bigger trees.Removing dead wood and crossing branches helps open plants up to allow light and air to penetrate into the plant while removing potential host sites for insects. Selective hand pruning will help plants keep their natural, intended form. Winter pruning of your ornamental landscape plants will increase the health and vigor of the plants by stimulating new growth, while keeping the size of the plants in check so your landscape can last many years.

Winter pruning has many other benefits. With no leaves on the deciduous plant material, the structure and potential shape can be clearly defined. Plants heal more quickly in the winter so there is less trauma and almost no potential for harboring insects and disease in the fresh cuts.

Protect your investment in the garden by having one of our professional horticulturalists come by and provide a complimentary winter pruning consultation and estimate. Contact us today to schedule your consultation.

Written by Sal Masullo and Ashley Palko

Monday
Dec092013

Winter Pruning

The structure of a tree is more pronounced in winter.With the holidays upon us it is very hard to focus our attention elsewhere. It is easy to ignore your faithful, irreplaceable trees at this time of year surrounded by holiday music, lights and family. Do I hear the pitter patter of reindeer on the roof or is that a tree limb that was not properly pruned?

Protecting your valuable shade trees from winter storms is as easy as proper pruning. Protecting your residence from the constant scraping of limbs flailing back and forth in the winter winds may help keep home maintenance costs down. A limb that ranges too close to the home will eventually rub the roof shingles or siding off of the most important member of the property, your house.

Proper pruning is one of the best things you can do to preserve trees in the landscape! In my experience as an ISA Certified Arborist, large trees that are pruned regularly may be the difference between a long life or the sudden demise of your mature shade trees. Regular or routine pruning means at least once every four years to correct structural growth and remove all visible dead wood. Regular pruning may be the difference between expensive repair bills or a happy house and trees.

There are several types of pruning that may be done for trees in the winter.

Horticultural Pruning: The judicial thinning and shaping of ornamental woody plants to allow air circulation and light penetration. Trees with intact structures may only need minor pruning to keep them separate from the house and other plants.

Structural Pruning: This type of pruning reduces weak limbs and branch attachments that can fail in heavy snow or wind. Your arborist may choose to remove a weak limb or support important structural limbs with cabling or braces to minimize the possibility of damage to the tree as a whole.

Rejuvenation Pruning: Pruning in late February and early March to rejuvenate overgrown and misshapen woody shrubs can mean the difference between renovating a landscape or redoing a landscape and starting over.

Contact us to speak to an ISA Certified Arborist today and they will help you determine a course of action for your property's trees and shrubs. Have the happiest of holidays!

Written by Gary Carbocci 

Monday
Sep162013

Fall Means...

Pumpkins, hot cider and football. But it also means core aeration, lawn renovation, bulbs and fall cleanup! Don't give up on your garden just because the weather has cooled. There are many items still on the check list before getting cozy inside for the winter.

This lawn could use an aeration and re-seeding.Now is the best time to help out your lawn. Core aeration can provide valuable air circulation to an established lawn. Now is also the best time to renovate your turf. Lime is very important, especially on Long Island. The pH of the soil across most of Long Island trends toward acidic. A simple soil test can figure out if you need to raise the pH of your soil to help your plants grow better. Tree Care of Long Island offers soil testing and lime application (among many other services) for your lawn and plants.  Fall is the best time to seed your lawn. Depending on the variety, grass seed needs a temperature range of 45-65 degrees Fahrenheit to germinate properly. Make sure to water adequately while not overwatering and that the seeds is in contact with the soil. Birds LOVE grass seed. To protect your seed sprinkle a light dusting of compost over it. This will also help keep the seed moist.

 

Bulbs. My favorite kind of fall shopping. The varieties available get more diverse and spectacular every year. We're placing orders now for installations to occur before Thanksgiving. Many times the first signs of spring are those crocus and miniature daffodils coming up in almost bare beds. Don't miss out on a fantastic spring color display! Daffodils are critter resistant but tulips are on the menu for deer, squirrels and other furry friends so plan accordingly. The key to a show stopping bulb display is massing. If there weren't enough one year, add more for the next season. You can never have too many bulbs! They are some of the most cost efficient plants you can put in your garden, especially if you get a naturalizing variety which will multiply and bloom for many years.


Don't forget to schedule your fall cleanup. Perennials and ornamental grasses need to be cut down, leaves collected and disposed of, whether on the ground or in the gutters. A blocked gutter can cause roof leaks if the water backs up under the shingles. Protect your outdoor furniture. We offer shrink wrapping for pots, tables and chairs, barbecues and other outdoor furnishings. Remember to have a professional blow out irrigation and pool lines to prevent damage from water freezing and thawing in the lines throughout the season. Drain and cover any fountains. Talk to a professional for pond care and winterization if you have animals in the pond. Hungry birds and raccoons can make a meal out of unsuspecting koi and goldfish when the weather turns nasty.

As we move into fall, keep the winter items in the back of your mind, such as snow plowing, anti-transpirant applications, decorations, winter compost, and more! Stay tuned for our winter entry.

Do you have a question for us? Comment below or contact us.