Subscribe to our Blogs

Entries in stormwater (4)

Wednesday
Feb122014

Sustainable Design in a Changing Climate 

Post Hurricane Sandy redesign for waterfront residence: no lawn, salt tolerant plants, bermed to deter floodingOver the past few years, you may have noticed the growing publicity regarding global warming. What can we do to stop it or slow it down?  In reality, global warming (also known as global climate change) is a natural process that has been occurring on and off since the formation of the planet. Industrialization has accelerated this natural process, releasing chemicals and particles into the atmosphere and waterways. Recently, strict regulations regarding clean air and water have been put in place to ensure the health and safety for people and our planet.  Keep in mind; regulations do not stop climate change.  Instead, they awaken industries, governments, and citizens to the sensitivity of our environmental resources and how much of an impact humans have on natural systems. 

As a result of climate change, we need to adapt our current lifestyles and adjust to new trends in weather. Global climate change is associated with large scale changes in weather patterns in various forms related to both heating and cooling. Sustainable design, also known as ‘Green Design,’ can aid you in this lifestyle transition and make life more eco-friendly. A sustainable design is defined by its sensitivity to environmental systems such as local hydrology, topography, and native plant communities. There are many benefits of sustainable design for the homeowner and it can prove to be a vital landscape investment.

Examples of sustainable landscape practices include:

Rain Barrel: A 55 gallon drum with screen and piping that is connected to your gutters. Rain barrels can have attached hoses, or irrigation lines to feed your plants with recycled water.

Vegetated Swales: A mildly sloping depression that directs flowing rainwater to existing drainage systems, while promoting water to infiltrate the soil and reducing stress on public sewer systems.

Porous Pavement: Layers of permeable material with void spaces that allow water to pass through the pavement and eventually infiltrate the soil beneath.

Green Roof: A living roof with plants that are drought and sun tolerant. Helps reduce heating and cooling expenses and is a beautiful contemporary aesthetic.

Retention Basin: Any constructed area designed to hold water and allow infiltration over time. Designs range from highly vegetated rain gardens to precast drywells underground.  

Award winning green roof, Eaton's NeckSustainable design practices can be implemented to mitigate the issues that homeowners face during climate change. To find the practices that work best on your property, start by identifying which natural systems affect you. Here on Long Island, wind can be a major destructive force that causes erosion. Windbreaks are a design solution that can help relieve some of the stress provided by windstorms. Plants can be used to screen wind and provide a comfortable microclimate in other seasons. Tidal surge is another erosive problem and is associated with sea level rise, wave action and severe flooding events. That is why it is crucial to have efficient stormwater management practices at your home, whether you are on the shore or inland. It is important to have a comprehensive analysis done for the existing conditions of soil and plant health on your property. This information can guide you in preventing erosion, slope stabilization and proper plant selection. Wildlife, plant life and human life can coexist symbiotically and evolve in unison with climate change.  

 

 

Goldberg and Rodler’s staff can help you with this process, while assisting you to design a beautiful and sustainable landscape. 

Written by Nick Onesto

Tuesday
Jan142014

The Benefits of a LiveRoof System

A Sample of one of our LiveRoof projects

A green roof or wall is just one of many steps toward more sustainable and environmentally friendly landscapes. We installed two green roofs at one of our award winning projects in Eaton’s Neck using the LiveRoof System. The residence was designed specifically for several green roofs and not just for aesthetic value but environmental benefits as well. 

The biggest advantage of installing a LiveRoof is to reduce stormwater runoff. The less polluted water that enters the sewer systems and groundwater is better for the environment. In the long term, if less pollutants enter the groundwater, less money will be spents treating runoff before it reenters the groundwater system. Reducing asphalt roofing surfaces also helps to reduce the heat island effect, where heat is absorbed during the day via streets, roofs and other dark, impermeable surfaces and released at night. Urban areas especially are a large contributor to the heat island effect, increasing global climate change. Sedums, which make up the majority of green roof plantings, transpirate at night, which cools the air. They also create an insulating barrier for both temperature and sound. A 25-50% energy savings is possible.

Another view of the LiveRoof project

The beauty of LiveRoof, a pre-grown modular system, means that it has minimal irrigation needs. Once established, the plants require very little maintenance. We specify fire resistant succulent plantings that have year round interest. Plants have the ability to clean the air of pollutants as well keeping the air quality higher around your home. LiveRoof's lightweight modules decrease load on the roof in comparison to plant-in-place systems and repairs require minimal disruption of the system because trays can removed and replaced individually.

LiveRoof plant modulesLiveRoof is a modular system of living plant material. These LiveRoof applications can be installed on flat or low pitched commercial and residential roofs. The sister product to LiveRoof, LiveWall, is a great way to dress up a non-descript architectural wall or to add some life into an intimate patio garden or hot tub area. The LiveWall can even be used to grow edibles and herbs for a kitchen garden. As a certified installer of LiveRoof, Goldberg & Rodler is your source for all things green.

Contact us today for more information, or visit LiveRoof to find out more.

Tuesday
Aug142012

Green Roof = Sustainable Design

A green roof is just one of many steps toward more sustainable and environmentally friendly landscapes. We installed a green roof in Eaton’s Neck using the LiveRoof System. The residence is designed specifically for several green roofs; not just for aesthetic value but environmental as well.
  
Advantages:
- Soil and plant matter provides insulation for temperature & sound
- Reduces stormwater runoff by absorbing water 
- Reduces air pollution & lowers the heat island effect with sedums that evapotranspirate at night
 
Pre-grown modular system:
- Minimal irrigation needs, especially once it is established
- Uses fire resistant succulent planting; plants retain moisture and are fit for arid conditions
- 25-50% energy savings 
- Lightweight modules decrease load on roof
- Repair requires minimal disruption of system; trays can removed and replaced individually
- Plant choices offer visual interest all year round
Thursday
Jul122012

Rain Gardens & Rain Barrels

We all learned about the water cycle in elementary school. It rains, plants and soil soak up water, plants evapotranspirate moisture back into the atmosphere and standing water evaporates, it rains. That's the simplified version. In reality, in our developed world, it takes a lot more steps for the water to go from the clouds to the ground again. Sewers, drains, and drywells capture runoff from impervious surfaces like asphalt, concrete and roofs and this water is either contained until it can slowly migrate back into the soil through the perforated wall of a concrete drywell, or it is sent to a sewage treatment plant to be treated with chemicals and reintroduced into our water cycle. The more impervious surfaces that cover our earth, the more water that is treated and wasted.
 
How can we lessen the impact on our drainage systems? Rain gardens. Let the soil and plants naturally filter out impurities and toxins from the runoff, as in other unpaved areas, and have a beautiful, diverse garden to enjoy. Sure, you can get a backhoe and even a crane to come in and dig down until you hit drainable material, then install drywells, and surface drains, but that is expensive. While it is currently the accepted way to deal with storm water runoff, it adds yet another step to a natural process that worked fine before human intervention.
 
You can also try a rain barrel. Hook one up to your downspout and use it for irrigation. Why pay the water company for treated water when you can collect it unpolluted for free? Some water tolerant (aka "likes wet feet") plants for these areas would be acorus, clethra, iris, daylily, bog rosemary, hypericum, and willow among others.