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Entries in stormwater management (4)

Friday
Jan232015

Project of the Month: Seaside Sustainability

LINLA Gold Award Winner 2014: Seaside Sustainability

 

We are proud to showcase our Gold Award winning project Seaside Sustainability, recognized by an esteemed panel of Long Island judges, for its unique environmentally sensitive solution in combination with a dynamic seaside aesthetic.
 A waterfront property can be captivating, entertaining, and breathtaking while showcasing the wonders of nature and her natural amenities.  However, there are risks associated with living on the water’s edge.  


Here is where you can watch the tides go by in a secluded seating area that is encapsulated by an aesthetically pleasing and functional design.

As many people know, in 2012, Hurricane Sandy brought with it a wave of destruction and chaos.  Tidal surges and winds were the major environmental forces that have now reshaped the landscape of this Hewlett Harbor property and many communities throughout the south shore of Long Island.

The waterfront perspective has been completely re-imagined into a passive use garden. A Hollywood juniper survived the storm and stands strong in the background.

A landscape we designed many years ago was one of the many in Sandy’s devastating path.   Tidal surge and prolonged salt water inundation during the storm compromised much of the plantings and all of the lawn.  Large trees were uprooted by strong winds and flooding was a major issue on this site. A once pristine waterfront retreat had become a horticultural nightmare and remained susceptible to future damage.  Disheartened by the damage to their property, the homeowners were contemplating selling their home to cut their losses.  Our professional design team worked with the homeowner to provide a sustainable solution by creating a more resilient landscape which they were going to use as a selling point when the house eventually went on the market.  The homeowner’s main concern was flooding in the lower level of their home and keeping the property lawn-free.  Our design initiative was to create a more sustainable landscape by implementing natural stormwater management practices, while being sensitive to the homeowner’s naturalistic and organic needs.  

The backyard has now become a series of interconnected spaces with an emphasis on planting.A revitalized waterfront landscape with an organic vegetable garden and gravel walkways.

 

 

A revived natural landscape shines through with a lush plantscape and ornamental birdhouse.The evolution of the planting design on the property was a result of input from our client and consideration of the coastal environment.  We planted trees, shrubs and perennials that are salt and wind tolerant that will endure many of nature’s challenges while offering a variety of colors and textures throughout the year.  Salt tolerant evergreens such as Eastern Red Cedar and Hollywood Juniper were planted for privacy screening on both sides of the property without compromising the spectacular water views.  Shrubs such as Shore Juniper and Winterberry were planted along with Dwarf Fountain Grass and Little Bluestem along the water’s edge to frame and enhance the water views from the house, patios, and bulkhead sitting areas.  We repurposed an existing formal rose garden that was trashed by the storm into a bountiful organic vegetable garden within a circular paver design to retain interest during all seasons. 

These landscape renovations were recently put to the ultimate test during a record rainfall when the high tide breached the bulkhead and started flooding our client’s landscape.  As the hours moved on and the tide moved in, all floodwater that moved into the site was diverted away from the house and infiltrated the ground as planned.  The success of a sustainable landscape can only be measured during extreme weather conditions, and this design proved its effectiveness and resiliency.  

The final overview of a resilient landscape design that combines both form and function to create a lush and entertaining waterfront lifestyle.

Written by Nick Onesto

Pictures by Susan Sotera

 

Tuesday
Jan142014

The Benefits of a LiveRoof System

A Sample of one of our LiveRoof projects

A green roof or wall is just one of many steps toward more sustainable and environmentally friendly landscapes. We installed two green roofs at one of our award winning projects in Eaton’s Neck using the LiveRoof System. The residence was designed specifically for several green roofs and not just for aesthetic value but environmental benefits as well. 

The biggest advantage of installing a LiveRoof is to reduce stormwater runoff. The less polluted water that enters the sewer systems and groundwater is better for the environment. In the long term, if less pollutants enter the groundwater, less money will be spents treating runoff before it reenters the groundwater system. Reducing asphalt roofing surfaces also helps to reduce the heat island effect, where heat is absorbed during the day via streets, roofs and other dark, impermeable surfaces and released at night. Urban areas especially are a large contributor to the heat island effect, increasing global climate change. Sedums, which make up the majority of green roof plantings, transpirate at night, which cools the air. They also create an insulating barrier for both temperature and sound. A 25-50% energy savings is possible.

Another view of the LiveRoof project

The beauty of LiveRoof, a pre-grown modular system, means that it has minimal irrigation needs. Once established, the plants require very little maintenance. We specify fire resistant succulent plantings that have year round interest. Plants have the ability to clean the air of pollutants as well keeping the air quality higher around your home. LiveRoof's lightweight modules decrease load on the roof in comparison to plant-in-place systems and repairs require minimal disruption of the system because trays can removed and replaced individually.

LiveRoof plant modulesLiveRoof is a modular system of living plant material. These LiveRoof applications can be installed on flat or low pitched commercial and residential roofs. The sister product to LiveRoof, LiveWall, is a great way to dress up a non-descript architectural wall or to add some life into an intimate patio garden or hot tub area. The LiveWall can even be used to grow edibles and herbs for a kitchen garden. As a certified installer of LiveRoof, Goldberg & Rodler is your source for all things green.

Contact us today for more information, or visit LiveRoof to find out more.

Tuesday
Aug142012

Green Roof = Sustainable Design

A green roof is just one of many steps toward more sustainable and environmentally friendly landscapes. We installed a green roof in Eaton’s Neck using the LiveRoof System. The residence is designed specifically for several green roofs; not just for aesthetic value but environmental as well.
  
Advantages:
- Soil and plant matter provides insulation for temperature & sound
- Reduces stormwater runoff by absorbing water 
- Reduces air pollution & lowers the heat island effect with sedums that evapotranspirate at night
 
Pre-grown modular system:
- Minimal irrigation needs, especially once it is established
- Uses fire resistant succulent planting; plants retain moisture and are fit for arid conditions
- 25-50% energy savings 
- Lightweight modules decrease load on roof
- Repair requires minimal disruption of system; trays can removed and replaced individually
- Plant choices offer visual interest all year round
Thursday
Jul122012

Rain Gardens & Rain Barrels

We all learned about the water cycle in elementary school. It rains, plants and soil soak up water, plants evapotranspirate moisture back into the atmosphere and standing water evaporates, it rains. That's the simplified version. In reality, in our developed world, it takes a lot more steps for the water to go from the clouds to the ground again. Sewers, drains, and drywells capture runoff from impervious surfaces like asphalt, concrete and roofs and this water is either contained until it can slowly migrate back into the soil through the perforated wall of a concrete drywell, or it is sent to a sewage treatment plant to be treated with chemicals and reintroduced into our water cycle. The more impervious surfaces that cover our earth, the more water that is treated and wasted.
 
How can we lessen the impact on our drainage systems? Rain gardens. Let the soil and plants naturally filter out impurities and toxins from the runoff, as in other unpaved areas, and have a beautiful, diverse garden to enjoy. Sure, you can get a backhoe and even a crane to come in and dig down until you hit drainable material, then install drywells, and surface drains, but that is expensive. While it is currently the accepted way to deal with storm water runoff, it adds yet another step to a natural process that worked fine before human intervention.
 
You can also try a rain barrel. Hook one up to your downspout and use it for irrigation. Why pay the water company for treated water when you can collect it unpolluted for free? Some water tolerant (aka "likes wet feet") plants for these areas would be acorus, clethra, iris, daylily, bog rosemary, hypericum, and willow among others.