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Entries in winter storm (3)

Monday
Dec162013

Winter Services: Protection and Prevention

Are you ready to say goodbye to 2013? Is your landscape ready for 2014? While everyone is busy preparing for the holidays, we're preparing for winter and spring. There's still time to protect your plants, clean out your gutters and schedule winter pruning.

Applying anti-desiccant to evergreens.PROTECTION: We're reiterating the important message in our previous article about protecting your plants for the harsh weather we expect during the winter. An anti-desiccant application can reduce water loss through the leaves during a time when your plants can't take in water from the frozen ground. You can reapply mid-winter for additional protection.

Road salt can damage your plants from piled up snow, as well as salt spray from the ocean/sound if you're near the water. Anti-transpirant is one option for reducing the potential for burned foliage. Heavily irrigating the soil in the spring helps wash away the accumulated salt in the soil. Fertilizing with an organic, salt-free fertilizer will promote new leaf growth and proper pruning can ensure the integrity of the plant's structure.

PREVENTION: During a heavy snowfall, if the gutters aren't cleared of snow and debris, ice dams can form on the top above the gutters and water may back up under the flashing behind the gutters. This can cause leaks, and if not treated, mold growth . It is very important to make sure these are clear after a storm if the snow doesn't melt away. Leaves and debris will further aggravate the issue by not allowing proper drainage into the gutters as the snow melts.

WINTER PRUNING: This is better for deciduous shrubs, evergreen hedges and small ornamental trees. The best time for this service is between Thanksgiving and Saint Patrick's Day.

Using a bucket to get up into the bigger trees.Removing dead wood and crossing branches helps open plants up to allow light and air to penetrate into the plant while removing potential host sites for insects. Selective hand pruning will help plants keep their natural, intended form. Winter pruning of your ornamental landscape plants will increase the health and vigor of the plants by stimulating new growth, while keeping the size of the plants in check so your landscape can last many years.

Winter pruning has many other benefits. With no leaves on the deciduous plant material, the structure and potential shape can be clearly defined. Plants heal more quickly in the winter so there is less trauma and almost no potential for harboring insects and disease in the fresh cuts.

Protect your investment in the garden by having one of our professional horticulturalists come by and provide a complimentary winter pruning consultation and estimate. Contact us today to schedule your consultation.

Written by Sal Masullo and Ashley Palko

Monday
Dec092013

Winter Pruning

The structure of a tree is more pronounced in winter.With the holidays upon us it is very hard to focus our attention elsewhere. It is easy to ignore your faithful, irreplaceable trees at this time of year surrounded by holiday music, lights and family. Do I hear the pitter patter of reindeer on the roof or is that a tree limb that was not properly pruned?

Protecting your valuable shade trees from winter storms is as easy as proper pruning. Protecting your residence from the constant scraping of limbs flailing back and forth in the winter winds may help keep home maintenance costs down. A limb that ranges too close to the home will eventually rub the roof shingles or siding off of the most important member of the property, your house.

Proper pruning is one of the best things you can do to preserve trees in the landscape! In my experience as an ISA Certified Arborist, large trees that are pruned regularly may be the difference between a long life or the sudden demise of your mature shade trees. Regular or routine pruning means at least once every four years to correct structural growth and remove all visible dead wood. Regular pruning may be the difference between expensive repair bills or a happy house and trees.

There are several types of pruning that may be done for trees in the winter.

Horticultural Pruning: The judicial thinning and shaping of ornamental woody plants to allow air circulation and light penetration. Trees with intact structures may only need minor pruning to keep them separate from the house and other plants.

Structural Pruning: This type of pruning reduces weak limbs and branch attachments that can fail in heavy snow or wind. Your arborist may choose to remove a weak limb or support important structural limbs with cabling or braces to minimize the possibility of damage to the tree as a whole.

Rejuvenation Pruning: Pruning in late February and early March to rejuvenate overgrown and misshapen woody shrubs can mean the difference between renovating a landscape or redoing a landscape and starting over.

Contact us to speak to an ISA Certified Arborist today and they will help you determine a course of action for your property's trees and shrubs. Have the happiest of holidays!

Written by Gary Carbocci 

Tuesday
Nov262013

Are Your Trees Ready for Winter?

At this time of year my thoughts are on turkey and the upcoming holidays, while our faithful, irreplaceable trees are outside in the cold landscape at the mercy of the oncoming winter storms.

Proper pruning is one of the best things you can do to preserve trees in the landscape! In my experience as an ISA Certified Arborist, large trees that are pruned regularly may be the difference between a long life or the sudden demise of your mature shade trees. Regular or routine pruning means at least once every four years to correct structural growth and remove all visible deadwood.

Properly pruning a young tree will set the stage for correct long term development in the structure of a tree. This helps protect the tree against damage from heavy snow, heavy winds and ice storms. An ISA Certified Arborist is best qualified to know which trees need pruning now and which may need pruning at a later date.

Although Mother Nature will determine what will ultimately be destroyed, a tree that is well prepared may be saved by proper pruning. Each time the tree is pruned the arborist will remove limbs that are weakly attached, diseased, and/or over-burdened, leaving structurally superior limbs. This process also reduces the overall weight in the canopy. Winter pruning allows wind to move through the tree and reduces the surface area for ice and snow to collect. Decades of experience have shown me that pruned trees have a better chance at surviving the winter gauntlet. In most cases, trees not pruned or maintained properly are the ones that are dangerous and make your property susceptible to severe damage from broken limbs or fallen trees.

We will gladly provide you with an evaluation of your mature trees. Contact us today to discuss both short and long term plans for the health of the trees on your property.

Written by Gary Carbocci